Piers

Westside Railyard
9/2/2001 01:33 PM
Westside Railyard

The 60th Street Railyard included six warehouse piers and three float bridges for transferring rail cars from car float barges to the railyard's tracks. The piers were given letter names B to I from south to north to distinguish them from the numbered piers to the south. A 1991 Hagstrom NYC map gives no piers A or C. The float bridges are located between Pier G on the south and Pier I on the north and may have been a Pier H at some point in the past.

Although a historic marker in the park says the railyard closed in 1971 after the Penn Central went bankrupt, I have seen a photo from as late as 1974 showing it quite active with rail cars and truck trailers. A fire on June 9, 1971 destroyed warehouse piers E, F and G and partially destroyed Pier D. Regardless, they had ceased to have significant value since the advent of containerization in the 1950s, which made hand loading of ship cargo (lighterage) obsolete and moved most of New York City's ship cargo activity to newer ports in New Jersey.

Whenever the railyard did close in the 1970s, what was left of the pier structures began to disintegrate from (nature and vandals) and by the time the pier area was opened as a crude park in 2001, all of the infrastructure had become ruins. Most of the ruins were removed within a few years for the creation of Riverside Park South, although some were integrated into the newly designed waterside park. The landscape design is by Thomas Balsley Associates.

Riverside park just north of the railyard
9/3/2001 11:23 AM
Riverside park just north of the railyard
Pier remnants
3/13/2004 04:42 PM
Pier remnants
Pier remnants, temporary bikeway
3/13/2004 04:52 PM
Pier remnants, temporary bikeway
Riverside Park South
9/1/2008 01:48 PM
Riverside Park South
Riverside Park South
9/1/2008 01:49 PM
Riverside Park South
National Register of Historic Places plaque
12/8/2006 12:19 PM
National Register of Historic Places plaque

Pier I

One of the more attractive features of the park is a completely renovated boardwalk pier over what was Pier I. There are no obvious remnants of Pier I.

Recreational Pier I
9/2/2001 01:30 PM
Recreational Pier I
Moorings north of Pier I
10/10/2008 11:40 AM
Moorings north of Pier I
Moorings north of Pier I
10/10/2008 11:40 AM
Moorings north of Pier I
Moorings north of Pier I
12/18/2008 11:12 AM
Moorings north of Pier I
Pier I cafe
5/13/2010 03:12 PM
Pier I cafe

Float Bridges

Perhaps the most distinctive ruins at the 60th Street Railyard are the remains of three float bridges that were used to transfer cars from car float barges to the railyard tracks. The northernmost bridge is capped by a gantry frame.

Northern gantry bridge
9/2/2001 01:33 PM
Northern gantry bridge
Northern gantry bridge
9/3/2001 11:26 AM
Northern gantry bridge
Northern gantry bridge
9/3/2001 11:31 AM
Northern gantry bridge
Northern gantry bridge
9/3/2001 12:00 AM
Northern gantry bridge
Northern gantry bridge
9/3/2001 12:00 AM
Northern gantry bridge
Northern gantry bridge
3/13/2004 04:44 PM
Northern gantry bridge
Observation platform on northern gantry bridge
3/13/2004 04:46 PM
Observation platform on northern gantry bridge
Northern gantry bridge
3/13/2004 04:46 PM
Northern gantry bridge
Northern gantry in the shadow of Riverside South
3/13/2004 04:44 PM
Northern gantry in the shadow of Riverside South
Old truck wheels on float bridge remains
9/3/2001 11:29 AM
Old truck wheels on float bridge remains
Center float bridge
9/3/2001 11:30 AM
Center float bridge
Old rails to center float bridge
9/3/2001 11:31 AM
Old rails to center float bridge
Southern float bridge
9/3/2001 11:32 AM
Southern float bridge
Southern float bridge
9/3/2001 12:00 AM
Southern float bridge
Southern float bridge
9/3/2001 12:00 AM
Southern float bridge
Dock guides
3/13/2004 04:42 PM
Dock guides
Dock guides
3/13/2004 04:42 PM
Dock guides
Float bridges
3/13/2004 04:48 PM
Float bridges
Float bridges
3/13/2004 04:48 PM
Float bridges
Float bridge gantry
10/10/2008 11:42 AM
Float bridge gantry
Southern float bridges
10/10/2008 11:43 AM
Southern float bridges
Central float bridge
10/10/2008 11:43 AM
Central float bridge
Southern float bridge
10/10/2008 11:44 AM
Southern float bridge
Float bridges
5/13/2010 03:09 PM
Float bridges
Southern float bridge
5/13/2010 03:10 PM
Southern float bridge
Southern float bridge
5/13/2010 03:10 PM
Southern float bridge
Float bridge shoreline
5/13/2010 03:10 PM
Float bridge shoreline
Float bridge shoreline
5/13/2010 03:10 PM
Float bridge shoreline
Renovation
2/24/2012 11:21 AM
Renovation
Renovation
2/24/2012 11:22 AM
Renovation
Renovation
2/24/2012 11:22 AM
Renovation
Renovation
2/24/2012 11:23 AM
Renovation
Renovation
2/24/2012 11:23 AM
Renovation

Warehouse Pier G

Warehouse Pier G
9/3/2001 11:34 AM
Warehouse Pier G
Warehouse Pier G
9/3/2001 11:35 AM
Warehouse Pier G
Warehouse Pier G
9/3/2001 11:36 AM
Warehouse Pier G
Warehouse Pier G
9/3/2001 11:37 AM
Warehouse Pier G
Remnants of Pier G pilings
10/10/2008 11:44 AM
Remnants of Pier G pilings
Pier G recreational pier
10/10/2008 11:45 AM
Pier G recreational pier
Remnants of Pier G pilings
10/10/2008 11:45 AM
Remnants of Pier G pilings
Pier G pilings and float bridge piers
10/10/2008 12:08 PM
Pier G pilings and float bridge piers
Pier G pilings
5/13/2010 03:06 PM
Pier G pilings
Pier G pilings
5/13/2010 03:08 PM
Pier G pilings
Pier G pilings
5/13/2010 03:08 PM
Pier G pilings
Pier G pilings
5/13/2010 03:09 PM
Pier G pilings
Pier G shoreline
5/13/2010 03:09 PM
Pier G shoreline
Old bricks at Pier G
5/13/2010 03:09 PM
Old bricks at Pier G

Warehouse Pier F

Warehouse Pier F
9/3/2001 11:40 AM
Warehouse Pier F
Warehouse Pier F
9/3/2001 11:41 AM
Warehouse Pier F
Warehouse Pier F
9/3/2001 11:41 AM
Warehouse Pier F
Warehouse Pier F
9/3/2001 11:43 AM
Warehouse Pier F
Warehouse Pier F
9/3/2001 11:44 AM
Warehouse Pier F
Warehouse Pier F
9/2/2001 07:27 AM
Warehouse Pier F
Remnants of Pier F pilings
10/10/2008 11:45 AM
Remnants of Pier F pilings
Remnants of Pier F pilings
10/10/2008 11:46 AM
Remnants of Pier F pilings
Remnants of Pier F pilings
10/10/2008 11:46 AM
Remnants of Pier F pilings
Pier F recreational area
10/10/2008 11:47 AM
Pier F recreational area
Pier F recreational area
10/10/2008 11:47 AM
Pier F recreational area
Pier F recreational area
10/10/2008 11:48 AM
Pier F recreational area
Pier F pilings
5/13/2010 03:03 PM
Pier F pilings
Pier F pilings
5/13/2010 03:04 PM
Pier F pilings
Pier F pilings
5/13/2010 03:05 PM
Pier F pilings
Pier F pilings
5/13/2010 03:06 PM
Pier F pilings
Pier F pilings
5/13/2010 03:06 PM
Pier F pilings
Geese at Pier F
5/13/2010 03:06 PM
Geese at Pier F
Pier F
5/13/2010 03:07 PM
Pier F
Pier F
5/13/2010 03:07 PM
Pier F
Pier F shoreline
5/13/2010 03:07 PM
Pier F shoreline

West Sider Linda Stone Davidoff (1941-2003) lead the coalition of civic and environmental groups that developed the compromise Riverside South plan in 1991 that reduced the size of the housing development in favor of this 27-acre waterfront park. Upon her passing, this section of the park around former Pier F was named in her honor.

Linda's Lawn
10/10/2008 11:47 AM
Linda's Lawn

Pier E

Only the pilings of Pier E and concrete foundation on the bulkhead remained when I visited in 2001.

Warehouse Pier E
9/2/2001 07:24 AM
Warehouse Pier E
Warehouse Pier E
9/2/2001 01:52 PM
Warehouse Pier E
Warehouse Pier E
9/2/2001 01:52 PM
Warehouse Pier E
Warehouse Pier E
9/2/2001 06:59 AM
Warehouse Pier E

The bulkhead was replaced with a more natural waterfront and a small recreational pier.

Grasses and boardwalk between Pier E and Pier F
10/10/2008 11:49 AM
Grasses and boardwalk between Pier E and Pier F
Remnants of Pier E pilings
10/10/2008 11:48 AM
Remnants of Pier E pilings
Remnants of Pier E pilings
10/10/2008 11:49 AM
Remnants of Pier E pilings
Remnants of Pier E pilings
10/10/2008 11:50 AM
Remnants of Pier E pilings
Pier E recreational pier
10/10/2008 11:49 AM
Pier E recreational pier
Willow tree behind Pier E
10/10/2008 11:50 AM
Willow tree behind Pier E
Pier E / F pilings
5/13/2010 03:02 PM
Pier E / F pilings
Pier E pilings
5/13/2010 03:02 PM
Pier E pilings
Pier E pilings
5/13/2010 03:03 PM
Pier E pilings
Pier E pilings
5/13/2010 03:03 PM
Pier E pilings
Pier E pilings
5/13/2010 03:05 PM
Pier E pilings

Warehouse Pier D

The twisted remains of two large lighterage (hand-loaded cargo) pier warehouses used to sit at the south end of the 60th Street Railyard waterfront. The more erect of the two was Pier D. A portion of the pier was removed in 2003, probably to dissuade people from attempting to climb onto the ruins at low tide. I believe Comic Times was a magazine.

Warehouse Pier D
9/2/2001 07:01 AM
Warehouse Pier D
Warehouse Pier D
9/2/2001 07:04 AM
Warehouse Pier D
Warehouse Pier D
9/2/2001 07:06 AM
Warehouse Pier D
Warehouse Pier D
3/13/2004 04:55 PM
Warehouse Pier D
Warehouse Pier D
3/13/2004 05:17 PM
Warehouse Pier D
Ruins of Pier D warehouse
10/10/2008 11:50 AM
Ruins of Pier D warehouse
Ruins of Pier D warehouse
10/10/2008 11:55 AM
Ruins of Pier D warehouse
Boardwalk and marsh grasses between Pier D and Pier E
10/10/2008 11:50 AM
Boardwalk and marsh grasses between Pier D and Pier E
Ornamental stone seats at Pier D
10/10/2008 11:52 AM
Ornamental stone seats at Pier D
Ornamental stone seats at Pier D
10/10/2008 11:51 AM
Ornamental stone seats at Pier D
Covered pavillion at Pier D
10/10/2008 11:52 AM
Covered pavillion at Pier D
Remnants of Pier D pilings
10/10/2008 11:51 AM
Remnants of Pier D pilings
Remnants of Pier D pilings
10/10/2008 11:51 AM
Remnants of Pier D pilings
Piling remnants of Piers D, E and F
10/10/2008 11:53 AM
Piling remnants of Piers D, E and F
Sea gull swimming amont Pier D pilings
10/10/2008 11:53 AM
Sea gull swimming amont Pier D pilings
New Jersey Responder Coast Guard vessel
10/10/2008 11:54 AM
New Jersey Responder Coast Guard vessel
Pier D Historic Marker
10/10/2008 11:54 AM
Pier D Historic Marker
Pier D recreational pier
10/10/2008 11:54 AM
Pier D recreational pier
Pier D recreational pier
10/10/2008 11:55 AM
Pier D recreational pier
Riverside South looming over Park at Pier D
10/10/2008 12:06 PM
Riverside South looming over Park at Pier D
Pier D
5/13/2010 02:56 PM
Pier D
Pier D
5/13/2010 02:59 PM
Pier D
Pier D pilings
5/13/2010 03:00 PM
Pier D pilings
Pier D / E / F pilings
5/13/2010 03:00 PM
Pier D / E / F pilings

Warehouse Pier B

Pier B was just a pile of collapsed steel when I visited in 2001 and was removed by late 2003.

Warehouse Pier B
9/2/2001 07:08 AM
Warehouse Pier B
Warehouse Pier B
9/2/2001 07:08 AM
Warehouse Pier B
Warehouse Pier B
9/2/2001 07:09 AM
Warehouse Pier B
Warehouse Pier B
9/2/2001 07:11 AM
Warehouse Pier B
Warehouse Pier B
9/2/2001 07:18 AM
Warehouse Pier B
Park under construction
11/17/2006 03:22 PM
Park under construction

After the pier remains were removed, the Pier B foundation was excavated for use with a new recreational pier, revealing a group of impressive stone structures.

Pier B Foundation
3/13/2004 04:52 PM
Pier B Foundation
Pier B Foundation
3/13/2004 04:52 PM
Pier B Foundation
Pier B Foundation
3/13/2004 04:53 PM
Pier B Foundation
Pier B Foundation
3/13/2004 04:53 PM
Pier B Foundation
Pier B Foundation
3/13/2004 04:53 PM
Pier B Foundation
Pier B Foundation
3/13/2004 04:54 PM
Pier B Foundation
Pier B Foundation
3/13/2004 04:55 PM
Pier B Foundation
Pier B
3/13/2004 04:54 PM
Pier B
Boardwalk between Piers D and B
10/10/2008 11:55 AM
Boardwalk between Piers D and B
Outline remnants of Pier B pilings
10/10/2008 11:56 AM
Outline remnants of Pier B pilings
Pier B pilings
10/10/2008 12:00 PM
Pier B pilings
Bulkhead foundation of defunct Pier B warehouse
10/10/2008 11:56 AM
Bulkhead foundation of defunct Pier B warehouse
Pier B foundation
10/10/2008 11:56 AM
Pier B foundation
Pier B foundation
10/10/2008 11:57 AM
Pier B foundation
Pier B recreational pier
10/10/2008 11:57 AM
Pier B recreational pier
Pier B foundation
10/10/2008 11:57 AM
Pier B foundation
Pier B foundation
10/10/2008 11:58 AM
Pier B foundation
Pier B foundation
10/10/2008 12:05 PM
Pier B foundation
Pier B foundation
10/10/2008 12:06 PM
Pier B foundation
Pier B foundation
10/10/2008 12:06 PM
Pier B foundation
Pier B foundation and recreational bridge
10/10/2008 11:58 AM
Pier B foundation and recreational bridge
Pier B foundation and recreational bridge
10/10/2008 11:59 AM
Pier B foundation and recreational bridge
Pier B recreational bridge
10/10/2008 12:04 PM
Pier B recreational bridge
Pier B recreational bridge
10/10/2008 12:05 PM
Pier B recreational bridge
Pier B recreational bridge
10/10/2008 12:05 PM
Pier B recreational bridge
Moorings burned in 1971 fire
10/10/2008 11:59 AM
Moorings burned in 1971 fire
Moorings burned in 1971 fire
10/10/2008 11:59 AM
Moorings burned in 1971 fire
RSPS announcement board
10/10/2008 11:59 AM
RSPS announcement board
Pier B and D ruins
10/10/2008 11:59 AM
Pier B and D ruins
Open water south of Pier B
10/10/2008 12:00 PM
Open water south of Pier B
Riverside Park South
9/1/2008 01:48 PM
Riverside Park South
Lawn south of Pier B
10/10/2008 12:01 PM
Lawn south of Pier B
Recreational area south of Pier B
10/10/2008 12:03 PM
Recreational area south of Pier B
Recreational area south of Pier B
10/10/2008 12:03 PM
Recreational area south of Pier B
Recreational area south of Pier B
10/10/2008 12:04 PM
Recreational area south of Pier B
Pier B recreational area
5/13/2010 02:56 PM
Pier B recreational area
Pier B
5/13/2010 02:56 PM
Pier B
Pier B foundation
5/13/2010 02:57 PM
Pier B foundation
Pier B foundation
5/13/2010 02:57 PM
Pier B foundation
Pier B
5/13/2010 02:58 PM
Pier B
Pier B foundation
5/13/2010 02:58 PM
Pier B foundation

Locomotive 8625

Just east of Pier B is an exhibit of a locomotive similar to the ones that moved cars around the 60th St. Yard. Locomotive 8625 is a 60-ton, 660-horsepower was a switching engine built in 1964 by American Locomotive Company. This engine served similar service in Brooklyn's Cross Harbor Railroad before being retired and moved here as an exhibit in 2006.

Locomotive 8625
5/13/2010 02:56 PM
Locomotive 8625
Locomotive 8625
5/13/2010 02:38 PM
Locomotive 8625
Locomotive 8625
5/13/2010 02:55 PM
Locomotive 8625
Locomotive 8625 and Me
5/13/2010 02:48 PM
Locomotive 8625 and Me
Coupler
5/13/2010 02:55 PM
Coupler
Locomotive 8625
5/13/2010 02:55 PM
Locomotive 8625
Locomotive 8625
5/13/2010 02:55 PM
Locomotive 8625
Locomotive controls
10/10/2008 12:02 PM
Locomotive controls
Locomotive 8625
11/17/2006 03:23 PM
Locomotive 8625
Locomotive 8625
9/1/2008 01:46 PM
Locomotive 8625
Locomotive wheels and coupling
10/10/2008 12:03 PM
Locomotive wheels and coupling

Pier 99

At 59th street, the active river piers resume with the Sanitation Department's Pier 99 which is the loading point for garbage barges ferrying the city's garbage out of the city to a variety of points around the country. New York City generates 8,627 tons of garbage each day, of which 3,913 tons are recycled. (Manhattan Spirit, September 12, 1997) There is a cruise ship dock just south of the sanitation dock.

Pier 99
9/2/2001 07:08 AM
Pier 99
Pier 99
9/2/2001 07:15 AM
Pier 99
Lawn and Sanitation Dept. Pier 99
10/10/2008 12:01 PM
Lawn and Sanitation Dept. Pier 99
Boat launch at 59th Street north of Pier 99
9/1/2008 01:49 PM
Boat launch at 59th Street north of Pier 99

Railyard Workers

Three gentlemen who had some professional association with the rail yard responded to a posting on railroad.net:

Jim Ferrante:

Hired out in 72nd on the Float Bridges in 1953 - first of a few jobs 'tween there and 33rd with side trip "trucking" LCL freight at Yonkers, then went to 466. On the outbound side we made floats for Wken, B&O, PRR, BEDT,CNJ,SIRT,LIRR and BUSH. The LI floats always seemed to carried a lot of construction materials. I pinned floats from Wken,the PRR,B&O( nicest looking tugs-Blue/Gray/Yellow Stipes.)SIRT. Also remember Gons & flats of Auto frames for Chevy TTown. Don't remember any NHRR tugs or floats.

Best move and don't know the official reason for this was a fall day- loaded a 3 tracker with head end cars of bag mail from Morgan Annex dest Penn Station NY. Could never figure why they brought 'em up frm 3Oth St NY, floated 'em cross the Hudson to Wken then to NJct for the PRR to take back into Penn Station. Must have been a hot move 'cause the GYM(C Holmes) & the YM were on hand to supervise to load. Thought it was a dumb move but as junior man was told "Hey kid,all your thoughts were dumb."

All 3 bridges were different. 4 was the newest (1914?) and easiest to work. 3 was open to the weather and a bear to work in the winter. With loaded floats you had to play with which way the river was flowing and which way the wind was blowing. Made a big difference when you started pulling on the winch wheels to tighten up the 4" hawser that secured to float into the apron. The 4 pins then controlled laterial movement. The tug capt.could slip it right to the apron or bounch it off the rack and make you sweat to get it in to pin it. Bridge 3 also had its own spl reach car a high side gon loaded with debris that was used when ever tide was up and the pontoon section had to be pushed down to line up the apron w/the float.

There was a Bridge 1 at 60th St.Just south of Dock B. My father worked it. Believe it was closed right after WW2?? Same style as Bridge 2. There was a team track milk yard at 6oth at the SE end of the yard,along the ave. Lead was on the left side of the cut as it started down. The land was sold to the NY Times for their "new" bldg. As a kid went to see the "Train of Tomorrow" there.

The floats were worked by one 5 man yard crew,and at the bridges were a Bridge Foreman,a clerk (doubled as weigh master) and 2 bridge operators. Inbound bills were walked to the yard office at 72nd and outbound bills were taken back to the bridge office. Two track platform floats(without Roofs) were also used for lighterage along side ships tied up at the piers. While I was there a few DES3 were working but Alco switchers were prime yard power, fgt diesel handled the frts while R's took the Mail & Express.

Ed Weinstein:

In the early 1930s, when my family was living on West 73 and 74 Streets, I used to walk down in the park to a sort of esplanade behing the old roundhouse and under the "Miller" highway. One could get a good view of what went on from ground level. Another viewpoint was from a bridge for employees from the end of either 70th or 71 Street.

The roundhouse, which I think in steam days ( no, although I did see steam further up on the West Side Freight Line, about 1930 when I was four years old, I never saw the roundhouse when it was steam operated) had about sixteen tracks had been reduced to maybe seven or eight. Next to the roundhouse was the YMCA, and also the yard office.

Most of the piers were used for lighterage. One of the oddities of the float bridges was that each one of the three was a different design, at least according to an article in "Transfer" some time ago. The NYC had a direct interchange with the the New Jersey railroads via the River Division ("West Shore") and the New Jersey Junction, so the main interchange function of the float bridges was for the LIRR. As late as the 1960s, symbol freight schedules showed two with LIRR connections. Another interesting function of the float bridges was "open Lighterage", a separate classification at Selkirk. This was putting loads on flats or gondolas, then putting the cars onto a car float to be moved by a tug along side a ship for loading. In a wonderful book "New York Shipping" by Willam H. Miller, there is a photograph of NYC float E27, with eight flat cars, each one of which had/has a street car (double truck Birney, to my uneducated eye) for shipping to Brazil via the Moore McCormack Line. They are being hoisted aboard the steamer by the floating crane "Columbia", and the site is the steamship company's pier at Canal Street.

The power in those days was all R2 motors and the DEs tripower switchers. In the 1930s, although I never thought about it, one of the big commodities unloaded at 60th Street was passenger automobiles; in those days, Broadway between Columbus Circle and 72nd Street was lined with automobile dealers. There was a lot of milk traffic at 60th Street; where the CBS studios are at 57th Street was the site of Sheffield Farms' dairy, which had direct rail access. But, I also think that there was other milk traffic handled through a team track setup west of 60th Street. The basic milk train service was two trains, one from the Albany/Troy area with many cars from D&H points, the other from Utica with Adirondack area cars. Also, there was the "Rutland Milk Train", which came down from Chatham ia the Harlem/Electric.

One other car float function was "dimensional" loads from Weehawken for West Side Freight Lion points; the restricted clearances on the Hudson Division made this neccessary. One other interchange of a direct nature was between the NYC and the NHRR was via Port Morris. This local area freight, to and from Bronx, Westchester and lower Fairfield County NHRR points.

Gordon Davids:

When I worked at Yonkers Yard in 1961-61, we handled a good bit of traffic for Habershaw Cable & Wire (Phelps-Dodge) at Yonkers, and Anaconda at Hastings. Most of the loads in and out from the PRR and other NJ railroads moved over the 60th Street Float Bridges. Every night after supper KD-11, the first trick Yonkers traveling switcher, went to 72nd Street with as many as 50 or 60 cars, and returned with about the same. Most of those originated or terminated between Tarrytown and Spuyten Duyvil, and were interchanged at 60th Street.

I think I remember FGEX reefers coming over 60th Street for Bronx Terminal Market with Florida produce. BTM had a float bridge, too, but the only cars I ever saw come across it were wine cars from the Erie. Their tug would come from Jersey City about once a week with one wine car on a float. They operated the bridge and landed the car themselves with a cable and capstan, so all I had to do was get the waybill and make an interchange report.

I was working second trick at Yonkers Yard in 1960 when Dock I burned. We could see the smoke up there. I think it had been used for transferring automobiles to lighters.