Bowne House

This house, built by John Bowne in 1661, featured prominantly in the early struggle for religious freedom in America. It was the first place of worhip for Flushing's Quakers, who were forbidden by Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant to practice their religion.

Bowne was arrested in 1662 for allowing Quaker services in his home and was then banished to the Netherlands. During his exile he was granted a meeting with Dutch leaders in Amsterdam. He described Stuyvesant's persecution of the Quakers and argued for their right to worship freely. The Dutch responded by reprimanding Stuyvesant and declaring, "The conscience of men ought to remain free and unshackled. Let every one remain free." In 1664, Bowne returned to this house, where Quaker meeting were held for another 30 years, until the Friends Meeting House (just around the corner) was built.

06/14/2007 14:11:19
Bowne House
06/14/2007 14:11:09
Bowne House

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