Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung

Five grand palaces were built by Korean royalty in Seoul and stood until being largely destroyed by the Japanese at the beginning of their occupation in the early 20th century.

Deoksugung was initially the home of Wolsandaegun (1454-1488), the older brother of King Seongjong. Gwanghaegun (1575-1641) made it an official palace in 1611.

Gyeongbokgung (Kyungbok Palace) was the main royal palace of the Joseon Dyasty and was originally built in 1395.

The Namdaemun gate was built in 1398 as one of three major gateways through Seoul's city walls. Those city walls were demolished in the early 20th century.

Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Namdaemun Gate
1967
Namdaemun Gate
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Deoksugung
1967
Deoksugung
37.565818, 126.975126
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Deoksugung: Junghwamun Gate
1967
Deoksugung: Junghwamun Gate
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - National Museum of Art
1967
National Museum of Art
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - National Museum of Art
1967
National Museum of Art
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Deoksugung: Gwangmyeongmun and the Heungcheonsa Bell
1967
Deoksugung: Gwangmyeongmun and the Heungcheonsa Bell
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Deoksugung: Junghwamun Gate
1967
Deoksugung: Junghwamun Gate
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Deoksugung: Gate and guard
1967
Deoksugung: Gate and guard
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Gyeongbokgung
1967
Gyeongbokgung
37.579604, 126.977057
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Gyeongbokgung
1967
Gyeongbokgung
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Gyeongbokgung: Throne in Geunjeongjeon Hall
1967
Gyeongbokgung: Throne in Geunjeongjeon Hall
Deoksugung / Gyeongbokgung - Gyeongbokgung: Gyeonghoeru (Banquet Hall)
1967
Gyeongbokgung: Gyeonghoeru (Banquet Hall)

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